Wednesday, 16 August 2017

Avatha discolor EREBINAE  EREBIDAE

Was:- Avatha discolor CATOCALINAE NOCTUIDAE
This moth has many synonyms, because they can be quite variable. It was given 10 different names by Walker  in 1857 and 1858, then a further 6 different names by Strand 1917 and 1920, only to find that it had been identified by Fabricius in 1794 and then, with a different name again in 1794.
Of the host plant species I could find, Sapindus, (Sapindaceae family) and Callicarpa (Lamiaceae) are the only plants families we have here.






Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- ERIBINAE
Genus:-  Avatha
Species:-  discolor









**********************************************************************************

Brithys crini NOCTUINAE NOCTUIDAE

Was:- Brithys crini HADENINAE NOCTUIDAE
The larval food plant here is most likely to be Crinum angustifolium. They bore up the stems of the plant.




Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- NOCTUINAE
Genus:- Brithys
Species:- crini





They are an attractive caterpillar and the larval food plant is a native to this area.




**********************************************************************************

Wednesday, 9 August 2017

Araeopteron canescens BOLETOBIINAE EREBIDAE

Was:- Araeopteron canescens ACONTIINAE NOCTUIDAE
One site suggests the sub family is Erebinae rather than Boletobiinae.
This moth has a wing span of about 10mm.





Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- BOLETOBIINAE
Genus:- Araeopteron
Species:- canescens

Not the best set of photos. I must try again.



















*********************************************************************************

Arrade destituta HYPENINAE EREBIDAE

was Arrade destituta HYPENINAE NOCTUIDAE





Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- HYPENINAE
Genus:- Arrade
Species:- destituta










**********************************************************************************

Wednesday, 2 August 2017

Amyna natalis BAGISARINAE NOCTUIDAE

 Amyna natalis BAGISARINAE NOCTUIDAE

This moth has been found from north Queensland to central New South Wales coastal and inland. The unusual patches on its wings probably mean it is a male and according to Moths of Australia, (I.F.B. Common 1990), "(the moths) make an audible sibilant sound as they fly in circles about 30cm in diameter and about 20cm above the ground. If disturbed the sound ceases immediately". He goes on to say that the cause of the sound and its purpose has not been studied and later says that it is possible the wing marks may play a part.
In our case the larval food plants are likely to be Abutilon or Sida rhombifolia (Malvaceae).



 Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- BAGISARINAE
Genus:- Amyna
Species:- natalis


















********************************************************************************

Anomis involuta SCOLIOPTERYGINAE ERIBIDAE

Previously:- Anomis involuta CATOCALINAE NOCTUIDAE
Since other moths in the same genus feed on Hibiscus and other plants in the Malcaceae family of plants, the most likely larval food plant here is a native Hibiscus. I have also photographed an Anomis Combinans larvae on Hibiscus here.





Family:- ERIBIDAE
Sub Family:- SCOLIOPTERYGINAE
Genus:- Anomis
Species:- involuta



Family:- ERIBIDAE
Sub Family:- SCOLIOPTERYGINAE
Genus:- Anomis
Species:- Combinans










Species names:-
Anomis involuta seems to be the preferred name but a couple of sites are using Gonitis as the genus so the list below shows some of the synonyms.
Anomis involuta (Walker 1858), Gonitis involuta (also Walker 1858) = Gonitis basalis (also Walker 1858) = Tiridata colligata (Walker 1865) = Gonitis vitiensis (Butler 1886) = Cosmophila dona (Swinhoe 1919) = Anomis brima (Swinhoe 1920) = sabulifera.

The last entry, A.sabulifera, is said to not be the same moth as A. involuta but a similar moth from Africa and is often confused with A. involuta. I will leave the decision up to those who are interested in such details.

*********************************************************************************