Wednesday, 16 August 2017

Avatha discolor EREBINAE  EREBIDAE

Was:- Avatha discolor CATOCALINAE NOCTUIDAE
This moth has many synonyms, because they can be quite variable. It was given 10 different names by Walker  in 1857 and 1858, then a further 6 different names by Strand 1917 and 1920, only to find that it had been identified by Fabricius in 1794 and then, with a different name again in 1794.
Of the host plant species I could find, Sapindus, (Sapindaceae family) and Callicarpa (Lamiaceae) are the only plants families we have here.






Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- ERIBINAE
Genus:-  Avatha
Species:-  discolor









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Brithys crini NOCTUINAE NOCTUIDAE

Was:- Brithys crini HADENINAE NOCTUIDAE
The larval food plant here is most likely to be Crinum angustifolium. They bore up the stems of the plant.




Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- NOCTUINAE
Genus:- Brithys
Species:- crini





They are an attractive caterpillar and the larval food plant is a native to this area.




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Wednesday, 9 August 2017

Araeopteron canescens BOLETOBIINAE EREBIDAE

Was:- Araeopteron canescens ACONTIINAE NOCTUIDAE
One site suggests the sub family is Erebinae rather than Boletobiinae.
This moth has a wing span of about 10mm.





Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- BOLETOBIINAE
Genus:- Araeopteron
Species:- canescens

Not the best set of photos. I must try again.



















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Arrade destituta HYPENINAE EREBIDAE

was Arrade destituta HYPENINAE NOCTUIDAE





Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- HYPENINAE
Genus:- Arrade
Species:- destituta










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Wednesday, 2 August 2017

Amyna natalis BAGISARINAE NOCTUIDAE

 Amyna natalis BAGISARINAE NOCTUIDAE

This moth has been found from north Queensland to central New South Wales coastal and inland. The unusual patches on its wings probably mean it is a male and according to Moths of Australia, (I.F.B. Common 1990), "(the moths) make an audible sibilant sound as they fly in circles about 30cm in diameter and about 20cm above the ground. If disturbed the sound ceases immediately". He goes on to say that the cause of the sound and its purpose has not been studied and later says that it is possible the wing marks may play a part.
In our case the larval food plants are likely to be Abutilon or Sida rhombifolia (Malvaceae).



 Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- BAGISARINAE
Genus:- Amyna
Species:- natalis


















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Anomis involuta SCOLIOPTERYGINAE ERIBIDAE

Previously:- Anomis involuta CATOCALINAE NOCTUIDAE
Since other moths in the same genus feed on Hibiscus and other plants in the Malcaceae family of plants, the most likely larval food plant here is a native Hibiscus. I have also photographed an Anomis Combinans larvae on Hibiscus here.





Family:- ERIBIDAE
Sub Family:- SCOLIOPTERYGINAE
Genus:- Anomis
Species:- involuta



Family:- ERIBIDAE
Sub Family:- SCOLIOPTERYGINAE
Genus:- Anomis
Species:- Combinans










Species names:-
Anomis involuta seems to be the preferred name but a couple of sites are using Gonitis as the genus so the list below shows some of the synonyms.
Anomis involuta (Walker 1858), Gonitis involuta (also Walker 1858) = Gonitis basalis (also Walker 1858) = Tiridata colligata (Walker 1865) = Gonitis vitiensis (Butler 1886) = Cosmophila dona (Swinhoe 1919) = Anomis brima (Swinhoe 1920) = sabulifera.

The last entry, A.sabulifera, is said to not be the same moth as A. involuta but a similar moth from Africa and is often confused with A. involuta. I will leave the decision up to those who are interested in such details.

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Wednesday, 26 July 2017

Agrotis NOCTUIDAE

Of the five moths below that we are supposed to be likely to find in this area, I have only ever been able to reasonably identify two,  Agrotis porphyricollis and Agrotis munda.
A. porphyricollis is fairly distinctive where A. munda and some of  the others are very similar, especially where the moths are not in the best condition. A. porphyricollis is only an occasional visitor here where A. munda is a regular pretty much all year round.

 Agrotis porphyricollis NOCTUINAE NOCTUIDAE








 Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- NOCTUINAE
Genus:- Agrotis
Species:- porphyricollis





 This one is in poor condition but is in its usual at rest position.











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 Agrotis munda NOCTUINAE NOCTUIDAE


The larval food plants of A. munda are many of our cereal and fodder crops where they can be a serious pest:-  Barley, cotton, lucerne, tobacco, tomato, maize and various vegetables.





Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- NOCTUINAE
Genus:- Agrotis
Species:- munda




















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Wednesday, 19 July 2017

 Aedia NOCTUIDAE

 Aedia leucomelas Sub Sp acronyctoides ACRONICTINAE NOCTUIDAE

Aedia leucomelas, the leucomelas species is fairly common through out Europe. The Australian representitive is sub species A. acronyctoides and is known through northern Australia and down the east coast and in South Australia.
The larvae have been found on Convolvulus erubescens (Convolvulaceae) and Chondrilla juncea (Asteraceae).




Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- ACRONICTINAE
Genus:- Aedia 
Species:- leucomelas
Sub Species:- acronyctoides





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Wednesday, 12 July 2017

Acontia  NOCTUIDAE   Week 3

  This is the final lot from Acontia. Although I have some other photos they are closely matched with the ones I am presenting here.

These are possibly Acontia detrita (Sometimes referred to as Acontia clarissa )






 Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- ACONTIINAE
Genus:- Acontia
Species:- possibly detrita species




















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I think this is Acontia crocata



Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- ACONTIINAE 
Genus:- Acontia
Species:- possibly crocata species but I may be wrong because I think they are possibly too tropical for us.





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Wednesday, 5 July 2017

Acontia NOCTUIDAE Week 2

These moths are tentatively named mostly by the elimination of the ones that they are least likely to be. This can hardly be called exacting or reliable, however the sample photos is what matters in this case. Positive identification is really not possible from the photos alone.




Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- ACONTIINAE 
Genus:- Acontia
Species:-  Possibly elaeoa species












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Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- ACONTIINAE 
Genus:- Acontia
Species:-  all four are possibly nivipicta species


















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Wednesday, 28 June 2017

Acontia species ACONTIINAE NOCTUIDAE


Before I start, I would like to point out that a synonym for Acontia is Tarache. So far as I can find, the preferred name is Acontia and the synonym is Tarache, but Tarache this is still used as the genus on a number of sites.
These moths are also very variable in colour and pattern. The result is that I am unable to be sure of the identification of any of these moths, however, since the aim of this blog is a visual list of the moths on our place just outside Toowoomba I still think it is worth putting them on the blog with the names that I think they are, and maybe someone in the future will be able to improve on my efforts.

 Acontia clerana ACONTIINAE NOCTUIDAE







 Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- ACONTIINAE
Genus:- Acontia
Species:- clerana (Possibly)




I think this is still the same species despite the differences.













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 Acontia detrita ACONTIINAE NOCTUIDAE

 


Family:- NOCTUIDAE
Sub Family:- ACONTIINAE 
Genus:- Acontia
Species:- detrita (Possibly)













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Below are the Acontia moths that are likely to be in this area.
Acontia clerana
Acontia crocata  (possibly too tropical for us)
Acontia detrita (Sometimes referred to as Acontia clarissa )
Acontia elaeoa
Acontia nivipicta


There were some other species listed but were under the genus Tarache and listed as synonyms of the species in the list above.

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Wednesday, 21 June 2017

Achaea janata ERIBINAE ERIBIDAE

Achaea janata ERIBINAE ERIBIDAE

(Was Achaea janata CATOCALINAE NOCTUIDAE)
The larvae feed on a large variety of plants and are considered a pest on the ones that are agricultural
crops. Some of the the most likely plants in this area are:-
 Macadamia Nuts (PROTEACEAE), Roses (ROSACEAE), Acacia species (MIMOSACEAE), Hoop Pine (ARAUCARIACEAE), Castor Oil Plants, (Ricinus communis (EUPHORBICEAE )), and Eucalyptus trees.





Family:-  ERIBIDAE
Sub Family:- ERIBINAE
Genus:- Achaea 
Species:- janata





The caterpillar photo was not taken on our property but on a private property nearby.



The moth to the left shows a slight difference in colouring.









Remember that the classifications for Noctuoidea have changed and I am now using the later classifications as shown in the blog for Wednesday, 31 May 2017.

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Achaea serva ERIBINAE ERIBIDAE

( Was Achaea serva CATOCALINAE NOCTUIDAE)

Similar plant selection to the A.janata in our area, Castor Oil Plant ( Ricinus communis,
EUPHORBIACEAE ), and  Roses ( Rosa, ROSACEAE ) being the most likely. Because we don't have Caster Oil Plant on our place, and we no longer have roses so this moth is a rare visitor.

 



Family:-  ERIBIDAE
Sub Family:- ERIBINAE
Genus:- Achaea
Species:-  serva


















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Wednesday, 14 June 2017

Stigmella Sp. NEPTICULIDAE

As you can see from the photos, this moth is tiny. The letters "a" and "r" are about 1.7mm.
From the written descriptions that I have, there are two Stigmella species that fit the description of this moth. Many of the moths in this family have a lighter wing colour and the band across the fore wing is yellow, where this moth has darker wings and a shiny white band.
The moths of the family NEPTICULIDAE generally have a wing span of 3 to 6mm.
The larvae appear the be found on a wide variety if plants. The moths of this family are also common in many other parts of the world.





Family:-  NEPTICULIDAE
Genus:- Stigmella
Species:- 

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Wednesday, 7 June 2017

Photographing the undersides

Hypodoxa erebusata GEOMETRINAE GEOMETRIDAE

It is important to photograph the undersides wherever possible.
It has taken some time to find the identification of this moth. One of the notable features is the "S" mark on both the forewings and the rearwings. There are a number of species in the Geometrid moths that have a similar marking and also are sufficiently similar to this moth to make identification difficult if looking at the upper surface only.

It was not until I came across an underside photo (BOLD systems) that I was able to separate the species. Unfortunately the sample photo did not have the wings fully spread, so some of the detail is missing, and there is still a little room for doubt, but I am confident the there is a sufficiently close match.



Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- GEOMETRINAE
Genus:- Hypodoxa
Species:- erebusata


underside of  Hypodoxa  erebusata








It is likely that the larval food plant is Eucalyptus.

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Wednesday, 31 May 2017

NOCTUIDAE and EREBIDAE

Since I am now using the later classification of EREBIDAE which came from the splitting of NOCTUIDAE I have made a list of the sub families that have had samples taken in  Australia.


Let me know if I have missed any Australian sub families.
Click on the picture to enlarge.
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Possibly Euproctis Poss galactopis LYMANTRIINAE EREBIDAE

 

Small white moths can be difficult to identify so there is plenty of room for error.

Family:- EREBIDAE
Sub Family:- LYMANTRIINAE
Genus:- Euproctis (Possibly )
Species:- galactopis (Possibly)




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LYMANTRIINAE Unknown 2863-5378

 Note the spurs, one long one short on the hind leg. The moth is missing a lot of scale.

 


 LYMANTRIINAE Unknown 2863-5378








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 LYMANTRIINAE  Unknown 1296-7837

 



LYMANTRIINAE  Unknown 1296-7837




 I have been unable to identify this one. It has some resemblance to moths in the Nygmia genus. It such a distinctive moth that I am surprised that I have not been able to identify it.


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