Wednesday, 27 July 2016

Chloroclystis moths LARENTIINAE GEOMETRIDAE




Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- LARENTIINAE
Genus:- Chloroclystis
Species:- insigillata (male)




Note:- Males have tufts on the forewing like this male C. insigillata.


Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- LARENTIINAE
Genus:- Chloroclystis
Species:- insigillata (Fem)







Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- LARENTIINAE
Genus:- Chloroclystis
Species:- Possible insigillata (Fem)






Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- LARENTIINAE
Genus:- Chloroclystis
Species:- catastreptes






Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- LARENTIINAE
Genus:- Chloroclystis
Species:- catastreptes  (Possibly)





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Wednesday, 20 July 2016

Some more Casbia Moths

This week, continuing on from the Casbia moths last week, here are some more moths I believe belong to the Genus Casbia, CABERINI ENNOMINAE GEOMETRIDAE.
The identification of the named ones is not certain, but I believe they are correct.


Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- ENNOMINAE
Genus:- Casbia
Species:- rectaria


Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- ENNOMINAE
Genus:- Casbia
Species:- Sp Possibly eremias
These ones often sit with their wings up like a butterfly.






Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- ENNOMINAE
Genus:- Casbia
Species:- rectaria  (possibly)


Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- ENNOMINAE
Genus:- Casbia
Species:- Sp

Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- ENNOMINAE
Genus:- Casbia
Species:- Sp Possibly rectaria possibly female





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Wednesday, 13 July 2016

More Geometrid moths

Casbia rectaria CABERINI ENNOMINAE GEOMETRIDAE

 



Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- ENNOMINAE
Genus:- Casbia
Species:- rectaria


 These moths have unusual markings on the forewing. They can vary from black or orange to creamy white and can at times be almost invisible due to loss of scales.
The most likely host tree here is the Alphitonia excelsa (Soap tree), which also hosts the larvae of the small but spectacular butterfly the Small Green-banded Blue (Danis hymetus). This is an excellent garden tree that is always full of insects and is a local native plant in this area.
Pomaderis lanigera is also said to be a host plant although probably more towards the coast.
Both plants belong to the family RHAMNACEAE.



This last moth is in the Casbia genus but may not be C rectaria. Next week I will add a number of photos from the Casbia genus showing the range we get here.




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Cernia amyclaria OENOCHROMINAE GEOMETRIDAE 

 



 Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- OENOCHROMINAE
Genus:- Cernia
Species:- amyclaria



The only mention of host plants is that they can be found on Gum trees.

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Wednesday, 6 July 2016

Continuing the Geometrid moths

Ectropis excursaria BOARMIINI ENNOMINAE GEOMETRIDAE

We are now getting into a series of moths that are very hard to separate by photographs alone.
Ectropis excursaria have been found to breed on a large range of plants. Further information can be obtained from :-  http://lepidoptera.butterflyhouse.com.au/enno/excurs.html



Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- ENNOMINAE
Genus:- Ectropis
Species:- excursaria



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Scioglyptis canescaria BOARMIINI ENNOMINAE GEOMETRIDAE

This moth, like the one above, are sometimes called bark loopers. In this case one common name is Fuscous Bark Moth.
I had this one in the genus Boarmia which it used to be in but was moved to Scioglyptis.
Although not completely sure of the species identification I am reasonably sure down to genus.



Family:- GEOMETRIDAE
Sub Family:- ENNOMINAE
Genus:- Scioglyptis 
Species:- canescaria




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