Wednesday, 27 April 2016

 SCHOENOBIINAE CRAMBIDAE

Tipanaea patulella SCHOENOBIINAE CRAMBIDAE








Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SCHOENOBIINAE
Genus:-  Tipanaea
Species:- patulella









I am fairly certain of this identification but there is a slight possibility that it could be Scirpophaga excerptalis which are a pest on sugar cane.
One description says they have a wing span of about 30mm but that sounds a bit oversize for the ones we see here. Sizes of adult moths can vary depending on the climate and available food souces. This is a very dry area at times.  If the size data was collected in the wetter tropical areas nearer the coast, where there are likely to be better conditions, then there are likely to be larger adults.

The larvae are also said to bore into the stems of Juncus species reeds and grasses usually in damp areas and that fits with sightings around here.

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Wednesday, 20 April 2016

One Year on

It is now a year since starting this blog. Thanks to all who are enjoying the blog enough to keep coming back. I hope that you are all learning as much about moths as I have been over the last year.

Researching the family Crambidae

The family Crambidae was originally included in the family Pyralidae but was separated out because of structural differences. There are still sites and books that lump them all together. There are also a variety of ways that the sub families and tribes within Crambidae are divided, which can make it difficult to find and cross reference an identification.

 Agrotera amathealis SPILOMELINI SPILOMELINAE CRAMBIDAE





Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SPILOMELINAE
Genus:- Agrotera
Species:- amathealis









The larvae are said to feed on Eucalyptus tereticornis.
They are a leaf tying caterpillar and can cause defoliation in Eucayptus plantations in Queensland.

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Cnaphalocrocis bilinealis SPILOMELINAE CRAMBIDAE





 Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SPILOMELINAE
Genus:-  Cnaphalocrocis
Species:- bilinealis







This one is in poor condition. We rarely see them. Presumably the larvae also feed on other plants.
The larvae feed on and are a pest on Oryza sativa (Asian rice).

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Aphytoceros lucusalis SPILOMELINAE CRAMBIDAE






 Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SPILOMELINAE
Genus:- Aphytoceros
Species:- lucusalis




Aphytoceros lucusalis are a shoot-boring caterpillar on figs.

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Wednesday, 13 April 2016

Continuing with Crambid moths

Conogethes haemactalis SPILOMELINI SPILOMELINAE CRAMBIDAE
Conogethes punctiferalis SPILOMELINI SPILOMELINAE CRAMBIDAE 


Neither of these photos are very good, but they are still good enough to identify from.
Conogethes punctiferalis larvae are a serious pest on fruit crops. In our case they probably eat their way into the fruit of citrus, Macadamia and the seeds of flame trees.





Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SPILOMELINAE
Genus:- Conogethes
Species:- haemactalis












Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- SPILOMELINAE
Genus:- Conogethes
Species:- punctiferalis





Although Conogethes haemactalis is a common visitor, it is probably actually breeding on a tree bordering our place but on a neighbouring block. Glochidion fernandi, Euphorbiaceae (Buttonwood, Cheese tree). It is also possible that it may be breeding on other plants here. Despite being fairly common, I never seem to have the camera when I see them, and when I have the camera, I can never find one!

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Wednesday, 6 April 2016

 Crambid moths

Achyra affinitalis PYRAUSTINAE CRAMBIDAE

 




Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- PYRAUSTINAE
Genus:- Achyra
Species:- affinitalis


Family:- CRAMBIDAE
Sub Family:- PYRAUSTINAE
Genus:- Achyra
Species:- affinitalis



This moth is quite variable in colour, so some extra photos will help to show the range of the colour, (assuming all my IDs are correct), and the various wing positions at rest.
The larvae feed on Sunflowers, Lucern, Cotton, Sorghum and  Saltbush ( Atriplex, CHENOPODIACEAE ). The saltbush is the most likely host here. We have quite a lot of it in the yard.
They apparently pupate in a silk lined burrow in the ground.

In this last photo is a very small moth in the left of the picture. I didn't see this moth when I took the photo and was quite surprise when I put it up on the computer. This is one of the pleasures of macro photography.


                                        on the left                                                                    on the right
                                       Family:- OPOSTEGIDAE                             Family:- CRAMBIDAE
                                                                                                              Sub Family:- PYRAUSTINAE
                                                                                                              Genus:- Achyra
                                                                                                              Species:- affinitalis

I have not managed a positive identification for it yet, but if you look at the base of the antenae, you will see that there are a couple of ridges of erect scales over where the eyes are.
The super family Nepticuloidae, contains two families that have the eyecaps, Nepticulidae and Opostegidae. Only two other families have the eye caps but in those families the caps are smaller. On looking through lots of photographs of all these families, I believe the family of this moth will be OPOSTEGIDAE. If anyone can identify this moth I would appreciate it if you could let me know.


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